Inspiring Reads: April 2019

I hate April Fools. But it is a good reminder that things aren’t always what they seem. This month I was inspired by posts about tricks to get us to spend more money, as well as things we should keep in mind as we continue to move toward financial independence. Wastes of money, 0% financing, the student loan crisis, getting off our phones, experiencing discomfort, and paying off mortgages are the topics featured in this month’s inspiring reads.

Photo by Carl on Unsplash

Save Your Money and Never Buy These 13 Things!

by Gary at Super Saving Tips

Marketers will lead you to believe you need many things. These super saving tips tell us why we don’t. I am guilty of recently purchasing workout clothing, but only a month after running regularly and realizing my existing clothes just weren’t cutting it. I did learn a new tip about fabric softener. Thanks, Gary!

6 Reasons Why I Hate 0% Financing, And Why You Should Too

by Dr. Breathe Easy Finance

As a naïve grad student, I purchased my first vehicle with 0% financing. I thought it was a great idea at the time. It wasn’t until years later that I realized why 0% financing isn’t the deal it appears. Dr. Breathe Easy explains why it is a bad decision in most cases.

We Don’t Have a Student Loan Crisis

by Their Money Goals

Are we facing a student loan crisis or a financial literacy crisis (combined with bad advice)? This is not to minimize the struggle of the slews of people who are saddled with crippling student loan debt. Rather, moving forward it’s important to not continue to fool our youth into believing that they just need to get a degree now and not worry about how to pay it back until later.

Photo by Eric Dungan on Unsplash

Experience First Pictures Second

By Life for the Better

Thank you, Life for the Better, for saying it! I was recently at my son’s swim meet and immediately after he finished a heat, someone wanted me to watch video of what I had just seen in person moments before. I didn’t know how to react. Was this a joke? I was literally standing right there. And no, I don’t want to look at your phone. I want to continue to be here. I just don’t get it. Life for the Better reminds us to live in the present.

Don’t Get Too Comfortable

By Your Money Blue Print

Living life with so many creature comforts, we now tend to find even the slightest discomfort intolerable. In the coping with cancer classes I teach, I often remark that we don’t experience personal growth during the good times. It’s through life’s challenges that we grow. For some people, challenges come in the form of unexpected and life-changing events. For others, the choice to push ourselves for growth may be optional. This article by Your Money Blueprint addresses what may happen when we are willing to step outside our comfort zone.

Why Young Parents Should Pay Off Their Mortgage Early

By Marriage Kids and Money

One of the myths I hate is that we will have a mortgage for 15 or 30 years. Andy Hill interviews husband and father Colin Murphy on how he paid off his mortgage in 5 years using zero-sum budgeting. Colin shares how he did it, and the benefits of doing so when your children are little. Myself a parent to three young children, my husband and I have also made it a goal to pay off our mortgage by the time my youngest starts pre-school. Reading the Murphy’s inspiring story helped keep me motivated to keep moving forward.

Photo by Charles on Unsplash

 

What inspired you this month?

One thought on “Inspiring Reads: April 2019”

  1. Pretty good list although everyone will have an exception or two because their lifestyle is different than yours. In my case I actually saved money buying a tux for $300 instead of renting over $100 worth of tuxedos a year. Plus I don’t have the hassle of renting and returning them. But I attend black tie affairs way more than your average person. I also distance run and play competitive tennis and believe me, technical fabrics make a noticeable performance in 90-100 deg F plus heat. But other than that, and maybe a preference for midrange wines over two- buck Chuck, I think you nailed it!

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